Seminary – O’Neal Historic District

Seminary - O Neal Historic District historical Marker
Marker located on Seminary between Irvine and Hermitage in Florence

Named for the O’Neal family which produced two Alabama governors and for seminary, the street on which the Synodical Female College was located, the Seminary – O’Neal Historic District was added to the National Register of Historic Places in 1995. Built between 1908 and 1943, the houses in the district reflect the variety of architectural styles of those years. Two Sears – Roebuck houses, called “American Four-Square”, add interest and distinction. The district opens onto the impressive campus of the University of North Alabama.

Seminary - O Neal Historic District photograph circa 2010
Seminary - O'Neal Historic District photograph circa 2010

Colonel Pickett Place – 1833

Colonel Pickett Place historical marker
Marker located at the intersection of Hermitage Drive and Seminary

This “double-pile cottage” is a rare Alabama example of Tidewater architecture that originated along the Southern seaboard during the colonial period. This house was built in 1833 by Thomas J. Crowe, proprietor of the early National Hotel in Florence, as a wedding gift for his bride, Elizabeth Hooks of Tennessee. It later became the home of Richard Oric Pickett, who arrived in 1843 to become one of the town’s leading attorneys. Pickett was Colonel of the 10th Alabama Infantry under General Philip Roddey, called the “Defender of North Alabama” during the Civil War.

Pickett Place photograph circa 2010
Pickett Place photograph circa 2010

Jackson’s Military Road

Jackson's Military Road historical marker
Marker located at Hermitage Drive and Seminary in Florence

Built by Andrew Jackson, 1816-1820. Shortened by 200 miles the route from Nashville to New Orleans for movement of supply wagons and artillery. Built with U.S. funds and troops. Followed in part Doublehead’s Road from Columbia, Tenn., to Muscle Shoals. After 1819 mail route was transferred from Natchez Trace to pass through Florence via Military Road. A portion of Hood’s army followed the road to Franklin and Nashville in 1864. In later years called Jackson Highway.

Wesleyan Hall – 1855

Wesleyan Hall historical marker
Marker located on the University of North Alabama campus near Wood Ave. and Circular Dr.

Chartered 1856 as Florence Wesleyan University, R.H. Rivers, President. Regarded as North Alabama’s most eminent landmark, this Gothic Revival structure was designed by Adolphus Heiman, Nashville, and built by Zebulon Pike Morrison, Florence, as new home for LaGrange College (organized 1830 by Methodists). Used by both armies at various times during Civil War. Deeded to State of Alabama, 1872, as first coeducational teacher training institution south of Ohio river. School expanded to become University of North Alabama in 1974. Listed: National Register of Historic Places

Wesleyan Hall photograph circa 2010
Wesleyan Hall photograph circa 2010

Florence State Teachers College

Florence State Teachers College historical marker
Marker located on the campus of the University of North Alabama in front of Weslyan Hall

Oldest state-supported teachers college south of Ohio R.

1830 – opened as LaGrange college (Methodist) at nearby Leighton. First chartered college in state.

1855 – moved here and re-named Florence Wesleyan University. Flourished until closed by war in 1865.

1872 – deeded to State by church; became Florence State Normal School.

1926 – present name adopted